Dancing in Cornmeal

Life With Autism

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Vicki C., M.S. CCC-SLP, from Georgia writes:

 

I am excited to express my enthusiasm for Dancing in Cornmeal: Life with Autism.

There are many books about autism on the market. Some are targeted at families and many others are targeted at professionals. This book is valuable to both. It is appealing as a story of one family and their daily successes and failures, but more importantly, it is a wealth of information about the treatment options and approaches currently available to people with autism.

Mrs. Silvernail gives the best description of self-stimulatory behavior that I have ever read. It is understandable to the layperson, but is complex enough to give the professional a better understanding of the dilemmas faced by the child and parents surrounding this perplexing behavior.

I want to make a billboard out of Mrs. Silvernail?s "assumptions" about children with autism:

First: There?s an intelligent brain inside this person.

Second: This intelligent person wants the same basic things that every typical person wants: to be pain free, to be like others, to receive love, to feel good, to be as independent as possible, to be accepted, and to have something interesting to think about.

So often we professionals view a child with autism, and other developmental difficulties, as a set of problems that must be solved. Even the most well-meaning of us forget how our attitude profoundly impacts the child?s performance. If I can remember Mrs. Silvernail?s assumptions at the start of each day, I believe I will be a much better clinician and parent. I hope that other parents and professionals read this book and gain the same opportunity.

My intention is to deliver this book into the hands of every parent of a child with autism that I know. I plan to recommend it to teachers and therapists as well, in the hopes that the children I serve will be better treated, better understood and educated to the best of their abilities.